Feature spotlight: To-Do’s

Jeff Koraleski, a technical services manager (TSM) at Buildertrend, joins us on The Building Code, for a “Feature Spotlight” on a true client favorite – To-Do’s!

Starting out as a customer success manager (something our listeners may know as a Buildertrend Coach) and spending some time on our product team before taking on his current role as a TSM, it’s safe to say that Jeff knows our product backwards and forwards, which is exactly why he’s the perfect person to discuss everything about the To-Do’s feature.

All About To-Do’s

In Buildertrend, the To-Do’s feature is located under the Project Management tab. The best thing about this tool: it’s easy to use for any kind of project. It doesn’t matter what size of company you are or what type of work you do, chances are you’ll love this feature if you aren’t already using it. Before implementing Buildertrend to-do lists, our clients use a wide variety of methods to track these tasks – Excel spreadsheets, with pen and paper … the back of drywall? Jeff has seen it all.

The primary function of the To-Do’s feature is to create a long checklist. As you walk the job site and notice things that need fixed, you can easily make your checklist and assign tasks to the right people, all from your phone and the Buildertrend mobile app.

Cool Features You’ll Find in the To-Do’s Tool

Take a photo to show your team or customer what exactly needs to be fixed. Draw an annotation to the photo with a handy arrow or whatever works for you to include more context and direction. Add the photo and annotation to your to-do list with a deadline to provide the perfect instructions for whomever is in charge of making the fix.

Your team or a sub can check off when a to-do list item is done, as well as upload a photo to prove to you that the fix was done correctly. Handy, right?

To-Do’s: An Oldie, but a Goodie … and Constantly Evolving

While the To-Do’s feature may seem simple enough today, it’s actually come a long way from where it first started with the help of client feedback. As a TSM, Jeff’s job is to take what our Buildertrend Coaches hear from our clients and relay that feedback to our product development team. A “win” for Jeff and the rest of our TSMs is to see a feature enhancement come through the idea pipeline and be pushed through to the live product. A really cool new product update that came from a client suggestion? Recurring items in the To-Do’s tool. This recent feature enhancement allows you to easily create the same checklist every week for your site walks

More About Our Guest

This wouldn’t be a “Feature Spotlight” episode without a fun fact (or two) about our guest, Jeff.

  • Jeff makes his own pottery! He’s in the process of converting his garage to a pottery studio, where he’ll have his own wheel and supplies (minus the kiln).
  • He loves his two English Bulldogs, Minion and Penny.

Links & More

Jeff Koraleski | Buildertrend

Tom Houghton:

You are listening to “The Building Code.” I’m Tom Houghton.

Paul Wurth:

I’m Paul Wurth. And today we’re doing a feature spotlight episode on To-Do’s.

Paul Wurth:

This is our third feature spotlight.

Tom Houghton:

These are great tools for anybody who’s trying to learn about Buildertrend, whether you’re using it or you’re looking at Buildertrend to learn more about our product.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah. It’s more about the functionality. And what’s also great is that we get to bring on a guest, and today’s guest is another long time Buildertrend employee.

Tom Houghton:

That’s right. We’re joined by Jeff Koraleski.

Jeff Koraleski

Hey, how are you?

Paul Wurth:

Hello, Jeff.

Tom Houghton:

We’re great, Jeff. Thanks for joining us.

Paul Wurth:

That moment seemed really like NPR Radio for some reason.

Tom Houghton:

It did.

Paul Wurth:

I’m not going to say it like the normal SNL skit, but yeah. You know what I mean?

Tom Houghton:

I did. It did feel that way.

Paul Wurth:

Let’s pep it up. Nothing against NPR radio.

Tom Houghton:

It’s true. Great.

Paul Wurth:

But let’s just get it a little bit more excited.

Tom Houghton:

Yeah.

Paul Wurth:

Hello, Jeff.

Jeff Koraleski:

Hey, Paul. How are you?

Paul Wurth:

Good. I’m doing great, thanks.

Tom Houghton:

Well, Jeff, let’s start off with a little background about you. Tell us your role here at Buildertrend, how long you’ve been here and we’ll go from there.

Jeff Koraleski:

Gotcha. I am on my fifth year here at Buildertrend. I started as a customer success manager, a Buildertrend coach now, I think, is what we’re calling it.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah.

Jeff Koraleski:

Through that time, I have done a good stint up in the product department and now I am a technical service manager.

Paul Wurth:

Well-versed.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep.

Paul Wurth:

And that’s pretty typical for a technical service manager because you’re the second one in a row we’ve had on, is that you need to be very familiar with the product, right?

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Paul Wurth:

And also have the customer service side where you started.

Jeff Koraleski:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), yeah. Got to be able to talk to everybody, got to know what the program does, how it should function, what things would help boost it in the future.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah. So for a quick refresher for everybody, a TSM, technical service manager, basically you’re the liaison between the client and our product team. Like, “What do you want to see? What’s not working? I’ll go fix that.”

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep, exactly right.

Paul Wurth:

Yep. So you just hit the easy button and there it is.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah, right?

Tom Houghton:

Yeah. Let’s dive into To-Do’s. Let’s talk about the functionality of the feature, so where they can find it, what’s the benefit of it? Take it away.

Jeff Koraleski:

Great. So our To-Do’s themselves, they are located under the project management tab there for us, just simply called to-do. Really, the best thing about To-Do’s is that, a couple of things, actually. They’re pretty easy to use and they are for all walks of life. I mean, it doesn’t matter how big or small the company is, doesn’t matter how many users are using it. Everybody can find value in our To-Do’s.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah. It’s super flexible because first, you could use it for your own personal task management. So To-Do’s are task management, we’re probably going to float in between both those terminologies.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep.

Paul Wurth:

It’s also one of the only features that can be used by the owner, the subs and the users, right?

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep.

Paul Wurth:

And it’s also job-specific, but then you could also have a general job you could run it on.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep. I’ve seen so many different ways people are using To-Do’s now. It’s pretty incredible to see it. Whether they’re using it for, say, just basic day-to-day task management, whether using it for punch lists, I’ve seen people even use it just to order office supplies.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah. Excellent. That makes sense. I mean, if you’re going to have your whole life in Buildertrend, you might as well create a to-do for it.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep.

Paul Wurth:

What is some of your experience when you’re onboarding people of what they were using previously to To-Do’s?

Jeff Koraleski:

Previous to To-Do’s, a lot of people, if they were staying within Buildertrend, they were just creating a bunch of schedule items, putting them all on the same day or multiple days throughout the time. Besides that, I saw people would create Excel spreadsheets and load them up into the doc section, and then just go through and check off things through our BT connect option there for them.

Paul Wurth:

And did you have people even outside of Buildertrend, just writing on pieces of paper, back of drywall pieces? Things like that?

Jeff Koraleski:

All the time. Yep. That was always one of those things is people, when they first came into Buildertrend, one of the first things they asked was, “How do I print this off with my whole list?” Because they always have somebody who’s not using a smartphone or anything like that and they want paper.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah, exactly. We’re trying to get them away from that.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep.

Paul Wurth:

It’s good. Save the trees.

Tom Houghton:

It’s good. It’s a good mission.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah. You’re an environmentalist.

Tom Houghton:

Apparently.

Paul Wurth:

I mean, you love solar and you have a Tesla.

Tom Houghton:

I mean, I just think we could be good stewards with the materials we’ve been given.

Paul Wurth:

I agree.

Jeff Koraleski:

You can always do better.

Tom Houghton:

That’s right.

Paul Wurth:

Moving-

Tom Houghton:

Speaking of better.

Paul Wurth:

Oh, segue. Segway Tom.

Tom Houghton:

I should get a Segway.

Paul Wurth:

Tommy Segway.

Tom Houghton:

I should just roll around the office like-

Paul Wurth:

That would be on brand for you.

Tom Houghton:

That would be. I think so. So To-Do’s.

Paul Wurth:

For somebody who’s never used this feature, let’s just kind of break it down.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Paul Wurth:

Right? So what are some of the great features within this feature and how would that help them day to day?

Jeff Koraleski:

So the primary function of a to-do is being able to create your checklist. Whether it’s, say you’re just walking the site and you start seeing a list of things that need to get fixed, you can just pull up in your mobile app and start creating your checklist right there, and assign that to any user that needs to be aware and needs to be able to fix it right there for you.

Paul Wurth:

That’s a unique one. So a lot of task management apps out there… Again, to-do’s our task management apps, they’ll let you create a checklist, but then you won’t be able to assign the individual items to an individual user, sub or owner. But we made that update a year and a half ago or so, that not only can you assign a line item within one to-do… So just call it, you’re on the Johnson job and you’re doing the final punch list, let’s say you have 10 items. You can assign the line item to the specific user or sub and also add a specific photo to the line item.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Paul Wurth:

So what would the use case of that be there?

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah. So I always like using punch-lists as the example for a to-do, just because, like you said, you’re on the Johnson job and you’re walking through and you see, I don’t know, say like a hole in the wall or something like that. I mean, obviously a house has plenty of walls, you want to take a nice, quick picture of it to just specify where it is. You can even use our photo annotations to highlight the area that needs to get fixed there for you. And then from there, assign that particular checklist item to your sub to get it fixed, but then you can also assign the overall to-do to your homeowner so that that way, they can go through and verify that the work’s actually been done for you right then and there too.

Paul Wurth:

The only other thing, have you seen our clients use it where they’ll assign a line item to the drywall guy with a photo of the hole in the wall and then request that the sub not only checks it off, but adds their own photo of the completed work?

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah. That’s actually, being able to add in those additional photos, I think that was a new update that came out just this past year as well for us.

Paul Wurth:

There you go.

Tom Houghton:

That’s a great follow-up to that. I think we frequently focus on taking the photo beforehand, but actually doing a photo afterwards to make sure the work got done correctly…

Paul Wurth:

Right.

Tom Houghton:

That’s that’s a good point there for everybody.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Paul Wurth:

Let’s talk about the fact that you can add a deadline to the To-Do’s. That’s kind of an, again, if I’m making a to-do list in my notes app on my iPhone, it’s just like the circle dots. There’s nothing else tied to that. So we kind of talked about, we obviously can assign to somebody else, but let’s talk about deadlines.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah. That’s also another one of those great features about To-Do’s is we always like to focus on being able to hold everybody accountable for the work on the job site there for you. So you have that deadline. Great thing about the deadline is it’s going to start sending out reminders to anybody assigned to it.

Paul Wurth:

Right.

Jeff Koraleski:

But then also, when people do go through and start marking everything off completely, whether it’s just a checklist item or the overall to-do itself, it date and timestamps it of one, that user’s marked it completed. So later on, you can go back and see was this completed on time there for you. We’re holding everybody accountable.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah. So it’s kind of like RFIs.

Jeff Koraleski:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Paul Wurth:

So we’ll tease that for the next feature spotlight.

Tom Houghton:

Nice.

Paul Wurth:

Where, at any given time during the job, somebody who owns this phase can go, what has not been done yet? So going to search for your undone To-Do’s on a job is super simple.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Paul Wurth:

The other thing with deadlines is you can actually tie To-Do’s or checklists to the schedule items. They really work very cohesively together. So use case there that I’ve always used, post-framing checklist. So whenever we have framing in a schedule, we’re going to have at the last day of framing a checklist assigned there. So before we move on to the next schedule item or next phase, we’re ensured that it gets done. Yeah?

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah, exactly right.

Paul Wurth:

And people I’ve talked to said that that’s a living breathing to-do. What I mean by that is like, if we’re a home builder and our post framing checklist starts off at 10 items, well, the next home we do, we might go, “Shoot, we’ve got to make sure we do that every time moving on.” So now we’ve got the 11th item and it just keeps building, right? So every job’s got the most current to-do list.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah, exactly right. In fact, that’s actually another feature that I really like about To-Do’s, or another benefit is, I always call it reusability. And we have that option where you can actually copy a to-do from one job into the next job so that way, you don’t have to start off your whole checklist right off again there for you. You can keep reusing it over and over, and over again.

Jeff Koraleski:

So there’s a new update that just came out where you’ll be able to actually set your To-Do’s to be a recurring item on your schedule or even just in the To-Do’s themselves there for you. So if you want to set it to, say, like two weeks you want the same checklist to walk through your site there for you, you’ll be able to have all that information already pre-populated for you.

Paul Wurth:

So is that a good example of an idea that came from one of our clients?

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah, it’s one of those-

Paul Wurth:

They had a real-world problem. They said, “I can’t do this in Buildertrend efficiently.” So they would reach out to their coach first, and then that coach would hand the baton off to a TSM like you, and then you would then take all that information and get it up to our…

Tom Houghton:

Product team.

Paul Wurth:

Product team. It goes in their product roadmap and out comes this beautiful new update.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah. In fact, I think the actual pain point was, even though we had the option to copy To-Do’s, it was still a manual process to go through and copy a to-do for every other week there for you. You’d have to go through a series of checks to get that set up there for you. Whereas, now it’s kind of functional, almost exactly like our way to set up recurring schedule items there for you, where you just hit copy, select how often you want it to go, and you’re all set.

Paul Wurth:

Good.

Tom Houghton:

I love, that’s such a great example of… We really pride ourselves on listening to our customers and there’s a pain point that multiple people probably spoke up about. And so, our engineering team took a look at it and those guys do really great work here, in Omaha, Nebraska, to get the product at the best it could be.

Paul Wurth:

Heartland developing at its best.

Tom Houghton:

That’s right. The Silicon Prairie.

Paul Wurth:

So Jeff, let me ask you about that. You and your team at TSMs, is that how you win in your job? Like you see the requests come in and you see it all the way to the release.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah, so the request comes in for us here and then it’s usually whoever the TSM is that sends it up to our product team. And our product team starts having meetings about what’s the goal to, meeting about the actual functionality, and then when we have the actual kickoff to our dev team. We sit in it every step of the way.

Paul Wurth:

Your job is to encourage ideas and updates and pain points from our clients, because that’s what you do all day long.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep.

Paul Wurth:

So we’ll give you guys all Jeff’s personal phone number.

Tom Houghton:

Check the show notes.

Paul Wurth:

Address, all that.

Tom Houghton:

No, it’s good. You guys are doing a lot of work behind the scenes and you’re making a difference in how people use the product. And I think that just is fantastic. So shout out to all the TSMs and all the hard work they do.

Jeff Koraleski:

Thanks.

Tom Houghton:

Let’s talk about priorities. You can set priorities, you can add tags to your To-Do’s. We obviously talked about attachments a little bit as well, but jumping back to priority, you can set a priority for them.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep, priorities, so ranging anywhere from, I think, from like high to low there for you. So if it’s something that is absolutely urgent, needs to get done today or tomorrow before any work can get done, you can go ahead and tag it that way. Makes it really easy to find right there on your list of To-Do’s because you can filter for that. Your subs can filter for that. Your clients can filter for that if that’s something that you assign for them to be able to see as well.

Jeff Koraleski:

Tags. I mean, tags are a way to really keep everything really organized and streamlined for you there. So it’s easy enough to go through and create a punch list or it’s easy enough to create a walkthrough, or just your day to day tasks there for you, but being able to filter all of your different To-Do’s, to be able to see where am I at with my specific punch list, say, across all jobs. So if you tag it that way, that’s how you can go through and find all those. It’s a great way to track your progress across all of those jobs at that point too.

Paul Wurth:

So you can create custom tags like punch lists, this is a punch list to-do, or this is a personal to-do, or this is a to-do for a sub or an owner. And then you sort that way.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep. Even a great list, another way I’ve seen people use To-Do’s is to be able to create just a materials list. So that way while they’re on the job site, making sure everything got dropped off, they have all their materials, they just check them all off, right off the list right there for them.

Tom Houghton:

That’s smart.

Paul Wurth:

Another level of customization is aptly named custom field.

Tom Houghton:

Yep. Hey, that was good.

Paul Wurth:

Great job by our product and marketing team.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Paul Wurth:

Where do I find customization?

Jeff Koraleski:

In the custom fields.

Tom Houghton:

Custom fields.

Paul Wurth:

So those that opens up To-Do’s to be really specific to the type of business they are, because we have four main segments, and inside that we have a hundred different types of businesses, home builders, re-modelers, specialty contractors, commercial, but everybody runs things differently. So this is a great way to get it customized.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep, very much so. One of the ways I like to see that coming through is, especially for larger houses or just larger builds in general. I had one builder back when I was a coach years ago, the buildings that he was building, I mean, you’d have you A wing, your B wing, your C wing. And so, that’s where they would go through and start listing what part of the house or what part of the build it was part of. They had a dropdown list, custom field there for you that they’d be able to go through and check that off for all their different locations where the work needed to take place for that particular to-do.

Paul Wurth:

People talk about being millionaires and billionaires a lot, but that’s how you made it.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Paul Wurth:

I think if you have wings in your house…

Jeff Koraleski:

For sure.

Paul Wurth:

That’s it.

Tom Houghton:

You probably did it.

Paul Wurth:

You’ve made it.

Tom Houghton:

Yeah. Speaking of making it, when you’re making it to-do, see what I did there?

Paul Wurth:

Wow.

Tom Houghton:

Out in the field, I liked it.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah, it was hot. It was good.

Tom Houghton:

Thanks.

Paul Wurth:

Mobile’s important, so we’ll allow the transition.

Tom Houghton:

You’re out in the field and you’re making it to-do, you can use our voice dictation feature.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep. If anybody’s like me, you’ve got fat fingers, it definitely helps to cut back on the auto-correct there, option there for you. So for your checklist items themselves, even just the description of the to-do, you just hit that little microphone button and start talking right into your phone, it makes it super easy to use.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah. You can also, right through the mobile app, is you can reorder the list. Some people want the To-Do’s in a certain order. They may not be the way that you’re walking in the job. So once you walk the job and sort of naturally, organically do your To-Do’s as you’re walking through, then you can reorder really easily, right?

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep. In fact, actually, one way I see that get used a lot is while they are walking through the job, like you said, they’re not dripping everything together right then and there. So they might have five or six different things on, say, a checklist of 20 different items. And they want to sort everything for the plumber at the top and everything for the dry wall or at the bottom, or so on there. So that’s a nice way that they can just drag and drop. Now, we also have that option where you can even hide all the items that are completed there for you too, so it cleans up that list so you can focus on everything that’s still not finished yet too.

Paul Wurth:

All right. So if you have a long list of things and it’s a weekend where you might have 10 completed, but they might be mixed in with the undone and confuse people. That makes sense. Great.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah. We’re always trying to figure out all the… Trying to give you the easiest way to focus on what still needs to get completed.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah, absolutely.

Tom Houghton:

This filter option on mobile is incredible. The list here of stuff that you can filter by is, I mean, keywords, assigned to. Think it’s assigned to, status, the priority. I mean, you’ve got a whole list of stuff here on mobile.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah, and any custom field that you create too.

Paul Wurth:

Nice.

Tom Houghton:

Circle back to the custom field.

Paul Wurth:

He’s got his iPhone. Are you an iPhone guy?

Jeff Koraleski:

I am an iPhone guy.

Paul Wurth:

Okay. So one of the cool things iPhone, a lot of people don’t know. And Tom, you might have helped me technically with this, is when you press your actual-

Tom Houghton:

3D touch.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah, so the 3D touch. So when you actually press the Buildertrend app icon, one of the quick shortcuts is To-Do’s.

Tom Houghton:

Yep.

Paul Wurth:

So if you’re listening to this and you do not know what I’m talking about, go find the Buildertrend icon on your phone, press down harder.

Tom Houghton:

Yeah. It’s like kind of like, I always tell people you’re kind of pressing through the icon instead of just tapping on it.

Jeff Koraleski:

Don’t tap it, yeah.

Tom Houghton:

You press through it.

Paul Wurth:

And then a shortcut comes up and a lot of things you can do, like add a photo, add a to-do.

Jeff Koraleski:

I think daily log’s on there.

Paul Wurth:

Daily log.

Paul Wurth:

Basically, what we see the most and it’s just, boom, you’re right back into the app.

Jeff Koraleski:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Tom Houghton:

Another fun fact about 3D touch and To-Do’s is if you 3D touch on an actual to-do, it will bring it, like it’ll pop into that one, but you can kind of like preview it a little bit first before you go into it. So if you just press and hold a little bit, it kind of gives you a quick preview to make sure you’re going into the right to-do there.

Paul Wurth:

Nice. I like that.

Tom Houghton:

It’s a fun little fun fact.

Paul Wurth:

Fun fact.

Tom Houghton:

Speaking of fun facts, Jeff, let’s ask you a couple. Let’s learn a little bit about you.

Jeff Koraleski:

Okay.

Tom Houghton:

And so, we’re going to start off first of all in saying that you’re a little bit of a culinary artist.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Tom Houghton:

Is that correct?

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep.

Tom Houghton:

Could you share…

Jeff Koraleski:

For 10 years before coming to Buildertrend.

Paul Wurth:

So you were a chef?

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Tom Houghton:

10 years.

Paul Wurth:

You went to culinary school?

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep.

Paul Wurth:

And did you work at a restaurant?

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep.

Paul Wurth:

What was your title there?

Jeff Koraleski:

I started off as just a prep chef. I worked at a couple of different line stations throughout the years and I ended as a sous chef.

Paul Wurth:

Nice. So do you still do that at home?

Jeff Koraleski:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Paul Wurth:

What’s some of your go-to dishes?

Jeff Koraleski:

I like doing, I guess, kind of a shout out to one of our other guys here. We started calling it a butter steak.

Paul Wurth:

Oh.

Jeff Koraleski:

So I will take a New York strip, is usually the best cut for this type of preparation, where I will put it in a Ziploc bag with a stick of butter, a couple of cloves of garlic and some rosemary.

Paul Wurth:

A whole stick?

Jeff Koraleski:

Whole stick, yeah.

Tom Houghton:

This is a great dish already. I’m already loving it.

Jeff Koraleski:

It’s a butter steak. So then from there, I put it in a water bath, sous vide style, for 130 degrees for an hour. Take it out, let it rest for about 20 minutes. And then from there, while that’s resting, I’ll get a cast iron skillet going, I’ll salt and pepper the steak, get the skillet rip-roaring hot and then sear it for about two minutes on one side. And then when I flip it, I throw the rest of the butter back in there with the garlic, more fresh garlic and more fresh rosemary, and I’ll just baste it for about 45 seconds.

Paul Wurth:

Oh, my.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah. It’s a pretty killer way to eat a steak because it’ll give you a heart attack.

Paul Wurth:

That’s a good joke.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Paul Wurth:

I like that.

Tom Houghton:

No, that sounds delicious.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah. Well, you won the chili eating contest, what? Two years ago? Or every year?

Jeff Koraleski:

No, I came in second on the, on the chili eating contest.

Paul Wurth:

Oh, I thought you came in first.

Jeff Koraleski:

It was rigged.

Tom Houghton:

It was really tight.

Paul Wurth:

You had a bunch of really unique meats in there.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah. I had seven different types of animals in the chili.

Tom Houghton:

That’s a lot of animals.

Paul Wurth:

Going for a refined palate.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah. But I won the barbecue cook-off.

Paul Wurth:

Of course.

Tom Houghton:

There you go.

Paul Wurth:

There you go. It’s good.

Tom Houghton:

So you also like graphic novels, is that correct? Like comics.

Jeff Koraleski:

I like some things.

Paul Wurth:

Movies.

Tom Houghton:

Okay, movies. Let’s transition to movies.

Jeff Koraleski:

Like Marvel stuff, you mean?

Paul Wurth:

Yeah, the Marvel.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah, there you go.

Tom Houghton:

Yeah. So you’re a big movie fan?

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Tom Houghton:

What’s your favorite movie?

Jeff Koraleski:

“American Beauty.”

Tom Houghton:

That’s not a comic book.

Jeff Koraleski:

Not a a comic book.

Paul Wurth:

Bit of a curve ball.

Jeff Koraleski:

But it’s my favorite.

Paul Wurth:

I like that movie.

Tom Houghton:

It is a great movie.

Paul Wurth:

That was good.

Tom Houghton:

Yeah.

Paul Wurth:

So have you seen, everybody’s talking about Marvel’s, what’s the last one?

Jeff Koraleski:

End Game.

Tom Houghton:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Paul Wurth:

Infinity?

Tom Houghton:

Nope. We’re not doing that on here. That’s like spoiler city.

Paul Wurth:

No, I don’t want to spoilers, but have you seen it? It’s the three and a half hour one.

Jeff Koraleski:

Oh, yeah.

Paul Wurth:

Have you seen it? Is it good?

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah, it’s like Lord of the Rings.

Paul Wurth:

So bring a pillow and a blanket, take a nap.

Tom Houghton:

Yeah, I think it clocks in like-

Jeff Koraleski:

Three hours, yeah.

Paul Wurth:

There you go. Okay.

Tom Houghton:

“American Beauty,” that’s an interesting pick.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Tom Houghton:

Why do you like it so much?

Jeff Koraleski:

It’s a guy who just, I don’t know, he was like settling for the longest time. He was just going through the day-to-day actions. Eventually, he gets to that point where he just kind of has enough and wants to try to improve himself and better his life. Now, granted there’s some questionable things that he does in that movie too, but I just kind of liked that. I liked the way it was shot. I like the style of the movie itself. And then I liked the fact that he’s trying to improve himself, kind of better his situation, so to speak.

Tom Houghton:

That’s good.

Paul Wurth:

What’s a fun fact about Jeff Koraleski?

Tom Houghton:

Give us one fun fact.

Jeff Koraleski:

Gosh, that one, I don’t know. Oh, I recently took up pottery.

Paul Wurth:

That is a fun fact.

Tom Houghton:

That is a fun fact.

Paul Wurth:

Do we have a, what do they call the spin thing?

Jeff Koraleski:

Just wheel.

Tom Houghton:

Pottery wheel.

Paul Wurth:

Do you have a wheel at your home?

Jeff Koraleski:

Not yet. I am working on converting on of the garage spaces into a studio.

Tom Houghton:

To a pottery studio.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Paul Wurth:

Very “American Beauty.”

Tom Houghton:

That is, yeah.

Paul Wurth:

Very much. He converts his garage to a weightlifting area, and whatever else.

Tom Houghton:

Spoiler alert.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah. Well, I mean, it’s been 15 years.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah. That one’s been around for a while.

Paul Wurth:

I mean, spoiler alerts, they expire at a certain point. So what do you like to make?

Jeff Koraleski:

I’ve made almost a full set of plates. I made 12 plates and seven of them survived the firing. And I am working on creating a really big bowl to make pasta with.

Tom Houghton:

Awesome.

Paul Wurth:

Love it.

Tom Houghton:

Do you have your own kiln then? Or where are you going to get these things fired?

Jeff Koraleski:

There’s a place out in Elkhorn, like a little studio space that they let you rent out from time to time, and then they do firings out there for you.

Tom Houghton:

Nice.

Paul Wurth:

You going to make your own cups and forks, and just get Game of Thrones on us.

Jeff Koraleski:

Oh, yeah.

Paul Wurth:

Nice. I like that.

Tom Houghton:

I didn’t catch the “Game of Thrones” reference where he’s making his own cups.

Paul Wurth:

Well, I mean…

Tom Houghton:

Like old school style?

Paul Wurth:

They can’t go to target and buy things, so yeah, they make their own. And I guess that was the reference.

Jeff Koraleski:

Stoneware.

Paul Wurth:

I thought your fun fact was going to be your bulldogs. You love bulldogs.

Jeff Koraleski:

Oh yeah, got two Bulldogs too. Yep. Two English Bulldogs, Minion and Penny.

Tom Houghton:

Great names for them.

Paul Wurth:

Minion and Penny.

Tom Houghton:

Minion and Penny.

Paul Wurth:

There you go.

Jeff Koraleski:

You have some, what do you call it? Cultural icons there for you. Minions, obviously, with “Despicable Me.”

Paul Wurth:

Yeah. I got that one.

Jeff Koraleski:

Penny from “Big Bang Theory.”

Paul Wurth:

Oh, I didn’t know that’s where it came from.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yeah.

Paul Wurth:

There you go.

Tom Houghton:

Okay. Let’s wrap this up. Jeff. Thanks so much for joining us on the podcast today and sharing your knowledge of To-Do’s.

Paul Wurth:

So if you’re not using to-do’s today, you should be doing it. Number one, how do you do that?

Jeff Koraleski:

How do you do that? First thing I would say is log into the program, just take a look. And at that same time, while you’re in there, go ahead and hit the question mark button to contact your coach.

Paul Wurth:

Yeah. So the top right of your screen, there is a question mark and then there is a Contact Coach, and it’ll give you their email, even a link to their Calendly, which is the scheduling app we use to book a time. To-Do’s, you can probably get kicked off in 15, 20 minutes, just the basics.

Jeff Koraleski:

Oh, yeah. Oh, for sure.

Paul Wurth:

Because it’s pretty simple. And then you’ll just sort of keep building your knowledge as you use it.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep.

Tom Houghton:

And if you’re on the go and you’re listening to this on your mobile phone and you want to check it out, open up the Buildertrend app. On the side of it, scroll all the way down to Contact Us and you’ll see your coaches. You can just tap a button there, a little phone icon, and give them a call. Awesome. Well, thanks Jeff, for joining us on the show again. Don’t forget to check out the show notes. We’ll have more information about To-Do’s in there. And Jeff, we’ve got to put a picture of you being a chef somewhere.

Paul Wurth:

Or Penny and Minion.

Tom Houghton:

Oh, there you go. You and the bulldogs.

Jeff Koraleski:

Yep.

Tom Houghton:

We can do that. Thanks, Jeff.

Jeff Koraleski:

Definitely. Thank you guys.

Paul Wurth:

Appreciate you.

Tom Houghton:

Love what you heard? Don’t forget to rate and subscribe to our podcast so you can hear from more guests that will benefit your business. Also, please check out our show notes page for more information on what we discussed on this episode. You can find it at buildertrend.com/podcast. Thanks for listening and we’ll see you next time on “The Building Code.”

Paul Wurth:

Appreciate you.


Places you can find us

Get updates for The Building Code

Be the first to know when new episodes are released.

By clicking ‘Submit’ you are agreeing to our Terms and Conditions Agreement and Privacy Policy.
Return to top